15.10.21

Routes — Brett Robinson

I have a very good group around me, turning up to a track session on a Tuesday means business and there is a certain expectation that everyone has to lift themselves and each other up. Seeing guys like Stewy McSweyn becoming one of the best in the world is very inspiring and motivates me to get the best out of myself.

Obviously we know who you are, but for those that may not, please introduce yourself. Who you are, what team/group do you run with and how long have you been running professionally?

My Name is Brett Robinson, I’m the Australian half-marathon record holder. I’ve run professionally for the Melbourne Track Club and Nike for the last 8 years.

From what we know, you recently moved house. Where are you living now? Can you tell us a few things that you like/ don’t like about running in your area?

Yep, I recently moved to Richmond. I’m a 4 minute jog to the bottom of Anderson Street. I love how close I am to the Yarra, from there you can run just about anywhere in inner Melbourne. I can either go towards the city and do a big loop under the Westgate or go up to Studley park and Yarra Flats.

If you could pick one road or trail to run anywhere in the world, where would it be and is it somewhere you have run before?

Mt Laguna, California. It’s about a 40 minute drive into the mountains outside of San Diego. You run on a trail called the Pacific Crest Trail, it runs from Mexico to Canada. Mt Laguna is the first stop for people that are hiking the whole way. It’s some very tough and rough running but great views, sun every day and it gets you incredibly fit!

Music on the run? Who has been your go to artist and/or playlist?

I don’t listen to music that much on runs. I’m pretty lucky that I nearly always have someone to run with so when I run by myself I enjoy just having my own thoughts. When I do listen to music its most likely “ Sleep D at Hopkins Creek 2019 set”, a 3 hour set from some Melbourne DJ’s.

Is there anyone/anything in particular that inspires you to keep pushing yourself and your limits at the professional level?

I have a very good group around me, turning up to a track session on a Tuesday means business and there is a certain expectation that everyone has to lift themselves and each other up. Seeing guys like Stewy McSweyn becoming one of the best in the world is very inspiring and motivates me to get the best out of myself.

We are seeing more and more athletes around Melbourne jumping on board with Pulse Running; what has been the most fulfilling part of coaching amateur runners?

Pulse has been going great, lockdown has really shown me how resilient people are. A lot of people are going through tough times but they still get out there, run and do their best knowing that one day soon a race will come up. When people message me after they have completed a tough session and you can see how happy they are really make me enjoy the coaching.  

Post Tokyo Olympics, what has your training looked like? What’s next on the racing calendar, are you training for anything specific at the moment?

I guess I’m in the same boat as everyone in Melbourne, waiting to see what happens with Melbourne Marathon. I’m hoping that it’s postponed rather than turned virtual, if so i'll start training for that. I would love to run a marathon in my home city.

From your experience, what would be your top three nuggets of wisdom for amateur runners trying to reach their full potential?

— Run without your watch sometimes, we all know a 60min loop from home. Just go and do it and run to feel. Then you’ll actually run the pace your body wants to not the pace your watch tells you.

— Join a group or a coach so you have someone to talk to. You need feedback, sometimes to hold you back, sometimes to push you harder.

— Do strides. Your body needs some faster turnover sometimes, it opens your legs up and then when you run half marathon pace it feels a lot more effortless

Routes — Brett Robinson